Russell Vought, Director of the Office of Management and Budget for the Executive Office of the President issued a Memorandum For the Heads of Executive Offices and Agencies on September 4, 2020 that stated that “Executive Branch agencies have spent millions of taxpayer dollars to date ‘training’ government workers to believe divisive, anti-American propaganda.” In relation to the memo, Trump wrote a Tweet stating that he ordered “a purge of critical race theory from Federal Agencies.” These statements are in reaction to an executive order (Establishing a Coordinated Government-wide Initiative to Promote Diversity and Inclusion in the Federal Workforce) that Obama put into place in 2011 that directed agencies to emphasize diversity and inclusion throughout the federal workforce. A few days later, Trump announced another forthcoming executive order to establish a national commission to promote patriotic education, the “1776 Commission.”

As scholars, educators, and members of the UNCG Coalition for Diversity in Language and Culture (CDLC) and the SOE Faculty Access and Equity Committee (FAEC), we are dedicated to working with and advocating for diverse communities. Together, we have provided a response to these executive orders, the push for a patriotic American history curriculum, and the push to defund training aimed at understanding white privilege.

Critical Race Theory (Crenshaw, 2002; Delgado & Stefancic, 2001; Ladson-Billings, 1998; Solórzano 1997, 1998; Yosso, 2005), originally developed by legal scholars, asks us to consider how we can transform the relationships among race, racism, and power, and work toward the liberation of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC). The goal of CRT is to better understand the current and historical systemic oppressions towards BIPOC that exist in our society, that is to say how the past proliferates our present across local and global scales. Growing from CRT are other critical theories such as DisCrit, LatCrit, AsianCrit, and TribalCrit. These frameworks unpack how racism is a social construction, and it also illuminates the narratives, experiences, and knowledges of BIPOC. Thus, the objective is not to be divisive, but instead inclusive of those who have been silenced and subordinated in the U.S. CRT, then, provides a way for people to acknowledge and name the ways in which systemic racism exists and perpetuates itself explicitly and implicitly.

We view the attack on CRT as well as the general attack on promoting diversity and inclusion and the fixed notion of what curriculum on American history should be comprised of as a direct threat to all BIPOC. That this framework of theories, which operate to challenge the ways racism is enacted and implicit in society, have been called to be “purged” by the President of the United States, demonstrates the hatred, ignorance, and divisiveness that burns deep in American roots.

We cannot keep quiet and take this sitting down. We call on our members and colleagues, through your own teaching, research, and advocacy, to combat the absurd and problematic attack on CRT and other related work that aims to dismantle racism and white supremacy and promote equity and inclusion in ways that explicitly name institutional power inequities throughout history and today.

November 9, 2020 | 3:00pm-4:00pm | Via Zoom: bit.ly/UNCG_CDLC

With the number of U.S. Latino students pursuing higher education on the rise, colleges and universities must consider ways to support this student population, which comprises a significant number of Spanish heritage speakers and first generation college students.

This presentation highlights mentoring practices and strategies to help promote academic achievement among Latino students, with insights from previous literature on Latinos in higher education and Spanish heritage language education, as well as faculty and student reflections.

Topics addressed include the important roles that language, culture, and identity play in education, and how strengthening community connections and providing opportunities for student leadership and growth can contribute to student success.

October 21, 2020 | 3:00pm-4:00pm | Via Zoom: bit.ly/UNCG_CDLC

While graduate students have many identities, ethnicity often remains the most salient identity for graduate students of color. Drawing from previous research on evaluation, higher education literature, and personal reflections, this presentation outlines five strategies for mentoring and advising graduate students of color. These include:

  1. Consider the impact of vicarious trauma
  2. Assist with the facilitation of peer and mentors ‘squads’
  3. Respect, honor, and celebrate students’ culture, religion, and families
  4. Be vigilant of microaggressions and practice microvalidations
  5. Develop mentoring competence

Each strategy will be presented along with reflections and practical examples for implementation.

While graduate students have many identities, ethnicity often remains the most salient identity for graduate students of color. Drawing from previous research on evaluation, higher education literature, and personal reflections, this presentation outlines five strategies for mentoring and advising graduate students of color. These include: 1)Consider the impact of vicarious trauma, 2)Assist with the facilitation of peer and mentors 'squads', 3)Respect, honor, and celebrate students' culture, religion, and families, 4)Be vigilant of microaggressions and practice microvalidations, 5)Develop mentoring competence. Each strategy will be presented along with reflections and practical examples for implementation.

The Coalition for Diversity in Language and Culture & The Faculty Access and Equity Committee’s

Join Via Zoom: bit.ly/UNCG_CDLC

You may access past workshop recordings from our CDLC YouTube Channel.

Please join us next Monday, December 2 from 12-1:30 at the Green Bean on Elm St. for our CDLC Holiday Social! At the meeting we will view posters from Community Voices hanging up in the coffee shop.

How We Came to This Place Where I Call Home
Community Voices is a summer writing workshop for refugee youth to tell their stories. In the exhibit at the Green Bean, their stories are displayed in order to promote, honor, and celebrate the voices of those who help to make the Triad a rich and diverse community. Come see the stories on display from December 2 until the end of the month. The exhibit features the stories of 25 refugee youth and the title for the collection, How We Came to This Place Where I Call Home, comes from one of the writers’ stories. The title reflects the journey they have all been on to finally settle in the Triad area of North Carolina. 
Community Voices grew out of Gate City Writes to provide refugee youth a space to tell their stories. It is coordinated and run by faculty in the Teacher Education and Higher Education Department, Drs. Amy Vetter, Bev Faircloth, and Melody Zoch along with doctoral students

The Coalition for Diversity in Language and Culture (CDLC) has issued a call for grant proposals which must be in line with CDLC’s mission to “design and implement research agendas responsive to identified diverse language communities…”. Details are in the attached document but the basic submission information is:

  • Proposals should be no more than two, single-spaced pages and should include: 
    • 1) the names and affiliations of all applicants; 
    • 2) goals/purposes, including how this aligns with the CDLC mission;
    •  3) expected activities and outcomes, including the involvement of each member; and
    •  4) a budget that outlines the plan for the allocation of funds.
  • Submission: Please fill out this form and attach the proposal there. 
  •  Application Deadline: December 1, 2019 by 11:59 pm (Late applications will not be accepted.)
  • Eligibility: Individuals or groups with at least one UNCG faculty (tenured, tenure track, or clinical)
  • Award Amount: up to $3,000 per proposalAt least two proposals will be funded. 

Questions can be addressed to Nora Bird, njbird@uncg.edu

Love and Compassion in Education

Call for Proposals

There are a variety of presentation forms and sessions available.

Proposals are due on February 25th, 2019.

Please submit your proposal at: https://goo.gl/forms/0lWCBown0sshRp912

Please find detailed information here: DLC Call for Proposals 2019